If you ever find yourself struggling to find the location of a street mentioned on an old document it is possible it could have changed its name.  There are a number of online sources that can help with this.  Just do a quick search and you may well find the old street name and what it is known by today.

An example of this is this website, which lists the names of London streets that have been changed:

http://maps.thehunthouse.com/Streets/Old_to_New_Abolished_London_Street_Names.htm#M
Lucretia Street in Lambeth is now Grindal Street.
Montague Terrace in Hackney is now Trowbridge Place.
Sklittles Lane in Plumstead is now Riverdale Road.
 
Picture
Ever wanted to see what it would have been like to wander through the landscapes of your ancestors?

A great free online source for historic old maps is available at www.oldmapsonline.org

 
Today marks the 125th anniversary of the start of construction of the Manchester Ship Canal.  Work started on 11 November 1887 and when it opened seven years later it was the largest river navigation canal in the world.

Construction of the canal was split into eight sections and first linked Eastham with Ellesmere.  The Eastham Locks were constructed at the mouth of the Mersey (and access to the open sea).  Through looking at the historic maps of this particular location you can see how the landscape radically changed in the space of a few years.

Below is a map extract from the Ordnance Survey map of 1872-74, prior to the Locks' construction:

 
A very useful and informative resource are historical maps.  And some of the earliest large scale maps (c.1:500 scale) were created by companies involved in providing fire insurance.  Maps for London date from the mid-18th century, and one company, Charles E Goad Ltd, was responsible for preparing maps for all of the fire insurance companies for the period 1886-1970.  The maps cover the central business districts of over 100 towns and cities in the United Kingdom.

An example of an extract from a Goad fire insurance map is provided below.  This dates from 1888 and is a central part of Manchester, at a scale of 1 inch to 40 feet (or 1:480).